Thinking of Doing a Double Major? Read This First

While the data on double majors is surprisingly sparse, one 2013 report from the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University, Double Majors: Influences, Identities, & Impacts, suggests that as many as 40 percent of college students at US colleges and universities are pursuing double majors. Which begs the question: Should you undertake a double major of your own? Read on for three pros and cons pertaining to the double major.

1. It supports creative thinking and original ideation.

The advantages of multidisciplinary studies are increasingly touted in the world of higher education. Research indicates that double majors open the door to stronger critical thinking, creativity and problem-solving abilities.

In addition to amassing more knowledge and broader skills, you also gain an invaluable broader perspective. These benefits holds up — whether you combine a “practical” major and a “passionate” major or two related majors which uniquely complement each other, such as mathematics and physics or business and marketing.

2. You’ll have more career options after graduation.

Today’s employers are looking for students with the skills and talents necessary to navigate today’s complex global business landscape. A double major not only indicates that you’ve obtained a breadth and depth of knowledge, but also signifies sought-after initiative. Doing a double major, after all, is the definition of going “above and beyond.”

3. You can always drop one.

No one will tell you doing a double major is easy. Hopefully, if you’re entering into a double major, you’re doing so informed and ready for the challenge. However, if it does get to be too much and you become overwhelmed by the workload, you have an advantage that a classmate with a single major lacks: You can always drop one.

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